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Country name:

conventional long form: Republic of Singapore
conventional short form: Singapore

 

Capital:

Singapore City State. Population: 4.6 million (2007).
 

Location:

Southeastern Asia, islands between Malaysia and Indonesia

 

Area:

697.1 sq km (269 sq miles).
 

 

Population:

4.6 million (official figure 2007).
 

Description:
The island of Singapore is situated off the southern extremity of the Malay Peninsula, to which it is joined by causeways carrying road, railway and water pipe. The Johor Strait between the island and the Malaysian mainland is about 1km (0.8 miles) wide. The Republic of Singapore consists of 63 islands and islets. It is a mainly flat country with low hills, the highest being Bukit Timah at 163m (545ft). In the northeast of the island, and in the urban district, large areas have been reclaimed, and much of the original jungle and swamp covering the low-lying areas has been cleared.
 

map of Singapore

Languages:

Mandarin Chinese, English, Malay and Tamil. Most Singaporeans are bilingual and speak English, which is used as the main language of communication.

 

Economy - overview:
Singapore's economy relies on entrep?�t trade, shipbuilding and repairing, oil refining, electronics and information technology, banking and finance and, to a lesser extent, tourism. From the late 1970s, the government promoted export-oriented and service industries with the intention of making Singapore a regional economic hub. The importance of trade to the economy cannot be overstated: the total value of Singapore's trade is almost three times its GDP (compared with 17% of GDP in the case of Japan). Vibrant economic activity more than compensates for Singapore's lack of natural resources. There is a little agriculture, with the cultivation of plants and vegetables, and some fishing; however, most foodstuffs and raw materials have to be imported. Singapore's only significant natural resource is its natural harbour, which is the busiest in the world. This accounts in part for the high level of Singapore's re-export trade, which accounts for almost half of all trade.

Economy:
Singapore's economy relies on entrep?�t trade, shipbuilding and repairing, oil refining, electronics and information technology, banking and finance and, to a lesser extent, tourism. From the late 1970s, the government promoted export-oriented and service industries with the intention of making Singapore a regional economic hub. The importance of trade to the economy cannot be overstated: the total value of Singapore's trade is almost three times its GDP (compared with 17% of GDP in the case of Japan). Vibrant economic activity more than compensates for Singapore's lack of natural resources. There is a little agriculture, with the cultivation of plants and vegetables, and some fishing; however, most foodstuffs and raw materials have to be imported. Singapore's only significant natural resource is its natural harbour, which is the busiest in the world. This accounts in part for the high level of Singapore's re-export trade, which accounts for almost half of all trade.
 

 

Industries:

electronics, chemicals, financial services, oil drilling equipment, petroleum refining, rubber processing and rubber products, processed food and beverages, ship repair, offshore platform construction, life sciences, entrepot trade

 

Exports:
Machinery and equipment, consumer goods, chemicals and mineral fuels. Main trade partners: China (PR), Hong Kong (SAR), Japan, Korea (Rep) and Malaysia.

Imports:
Machinery and equipment, mineral fuels, chemicals and food.

Exchange rates:

GDP :
US$134 billion (2007).

 

 

Useful links:

  • Ministries & Organization
  • Trade Associations & Chamber of Commerce

 

  • Trade Fairs
 
  • Others

 

 

 

  Copyright By :  Kish Trade Promotion Center  2002