Persian  | KFZO |  About us  |   Contact Us

     

Kish Trade Promotion Center                                    

 Home     |      Global Net       |       Iran Business     |        Free Trade Zones      |        Exhibition      |     Trade Opportunities  

Kish Overview

About Kish Island

History of Kish Island

Kish Climate

Photo Library

Map of Kish Island

Emergency Calls

Tourist Information

Kish Hotels
Kish Restaurants

Travel Agencies

Taxi & Car Rental
Banks & Exchanges
Sport Centers
Hospital
KFZO Affiliates

Shopping Centers

Shopping Centers

Behkish Bazar
Pars Khalij Bazar

Paniz Bazar

Pardise Bazar 1
Pardise Bazar 2
Zayton Bazar
Saffain Bazar
Marjan Bazar
Morvarid Bazar
Maryam Bazar
Hormoz Bazar
Trade Center Bazar
Venus Bazar

Kish Industry

Industrial Investment

Food Industries

Agriculture Industries

Health & Cosmetic

Textile Industries

Electrical Equipment

Wood Industries

Vehicles& Equipment

Chemical

Building Materials

Other Industries

 Investment in Kish

Investment Regulations

Tourism Industry

Trade in Kish

Monetary & Banking  

Export & Import

Insurance

 Training

KishTPC Training

Persian / English

 

Country name:

conventional long form: Republic of Peru
conventional short form: Peru
local long form: Republica del Peru
local short form: Peru

 

Capital:

Lima. Population: 8.5 million (2007).
 

Location:

Western South America, bordering

the South Pacific Ocean, between

Chile and Ecuador

 

Area:

1,285,220 sq km (496,225 sq miles).
 

Population:

29.2 million (2008).
 

 Description:
Peru is a large, mountainous country on the Pacific coast of South America that borders Ecuador and Colombia to the north, Brazil and Bolivia to the east, and Chile to the south. The Pacific Ocean lies to the west. There are three natural zones: The Costa region, which contains Lima (the capital), is a narrow coastal plain consisting of large tracts of desert broken by fertile valleys. The cotton, sugar and rice plantations and most of the so-far exploited oil fields lie in this area, as does the majority of the population. The highland Sierra contains the Andes, with peaks over 6,000m (20,000ft), most of the country's mineral resources (silver, zinc, lead, copper and gold) and the greater part of its livestock. The Selva, an area of fertile, subtropical land, lies between the Andes and the borders with Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador. The Amazonian jungle has vast natural resources. The absence of land communications, however, left the area largely uncharted until full-scale oil exploration began in 1973. Even today roads barely penetrate the region.

The population of the country is largely Indian and Mestizo with a noticeable influence from African, Chinese, Japanese and European (mainly Spanish) settlers.
 

language:
Spanish and Quechua are the official languages. Aymara is spoken in the Lake Titicaca area. Many other dialects exist in the jungle regions. English is spoken in major tourist areas.

Climate:
Varies according to area. On the coast winter lasts from June to September. During this period, the mountainous areas are often sunny during the day but cold at night. This is high tourist season and the best time to visit most regions. Heavy rains in the mountains and jungle last from December to April. It hardly ever rains in Lima nor most of the coast, except for Tumbes and Piura, which have tropical climates

Economy - overview:
The Peruvian economy is divided into two distinct parts: a relatively modern industrial and service economy concentrated on the coastal plain, and a subsistence agricultural economy in the interior. Inevitably, one consequence has been huge migration from the interior to the coastal cities. Most foreign investment is directed towards Peru's major industry, mining, which accounts for about half of export earnings. Meanwhile, tourism has snowballed and now brings in more than US$1 billion annually.
During the early to mid 1990s, Peru implemented important market-oriented reforms, including privatisation of key industries, trade deregulation and measures to attract foreign investment. The strategy was reasonably successful, and the country's economy is relatively stable. Foreign investment is growing rapidly in the mining, agriculture and tourism sectors. The unemployment rate was 8.4% in Lima in 2008, but it is estimated that up to 40% of the general workforce are underemployed. Peru's annual growth was estimated to be 9.2% in 2008. The inflation rate was 6.7%. The passing of the Free Trade Agreement with the United States in January of 2009 is expected to spur considerable growth in the next decade.

Economy:
The Peruvian economy is divided into two distinct parts: a relatively modern industrial and service economy concentrated on the coastal plain, and a subsistence agricultural economy in the interior. Inevitably, one consequence has been huge migration from the interior to the coastal cities. Most foreign investment is directed towards Peru's major industry, mining, which accounts for about half of export earnings. Meanwhile, tourism has snowballed and now brings in more than US$1 billion annually.
During the early to mid 1990s, Peru implemented important market-oriented reforms, including privatisation of key industries, trade deregulation and measures to attract foreign investment. The strategy was reasonably successful, and the country's economy is relatively stable. Foreign investment is growing rapidly in the mining, agriculture and tourism sectors. The unemployment rate was 8.4% in Lima in 2008, but it is estimated that up to 40% of the general workforce are underemployed. Peru's annual growth was estimated to be 9.2% in 2008. The inflation rate was 6.7%. The passing of the Free Trade Agreement with the United States in January of 2009 is expected to spur considerable growth in the next decade.
 

 

Industries:

mining of metals, petroleum, fishing, textiles, clothing, food processing, cement, auto assembly, steel, shipbuilding, metal fabrication

 

Exports:
Copper, gold, zinc, petroleum and petroleum and vegetables.

Imports:
Petroleum and petroleum products, plastics, machinery and vehicles.
• Main trade partners: USA, China, Chile, Canada and Brazil.

Exchange rates:
New Sol (PEN; symbol S/.) = 100 c?�ntimos. New Sol notes are in denominations of S/.200, 100, 50, 20 and 10. Coins are in denominations of S/.5, 2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5 and 1 c?�ntimos
http://www.worldtravelguide.net/country/224/money/South-America/Peru.html


GDP :
US$131.4 billion (2008 estimate).
 

 

Useful links:

 

 
 

مرکز توسعه تجارت کيش  1381 - 1384