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map of nepal

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Country name:

conventional long form: Kingdom of Nepal
conventional short form: Nepal

 

Capital:

Kathmandu. Population: 822,930 (2006).
 

 

Location:

Southern Asia, between China and India

 

Area:

147,181 sq km (56,827 sq miles).

 

Description:
Nepal is a landlocked kingdom sharing borders with Tibet to the north and northwest, and India to the west, south and east. The country can be divided into six zones: the Terai, the Chure hills, the Mahabharat range, the Pahar zone, the Himalaya and the Trans-Himalaya. The greater part of the country lies on the southern slope of the Himalayas, extending down from the highest peaks through hill country to the upper edge of the Ganges Plain. The hilly central area is crossed by the Lower Himalayas, where there are eight of the highest peaks in the world, leading up to Mount Everest. Wildlife in Nepal includes tigers, leopards, gaur, elephants, buffalo, deer and rhinos.

 

 

Population:

28.3 million (UN estimate 2007).
 

Languages:

The official language is Nepali (spoken by 49%). There are many other languages, including Maithili and Bhojpuri. English is spoken in business circles and by people involved in the travel trade.

 

Climate:
Nepal's weather is generally predictable and pleasant. There are four climatic seasons: March to May (spring), June to August (summer), September to November (autumn) and December to February (winter). The monsoon is approximately from the end of June to the middle of September. About 80% of the rain falls during that period, so the remainder of the year is dry. Spring and autumn are the most pleasant seasons; winter temperatures drop to freezing with a high level of snowfall in the mountains. Summer and late spring temperatures range from 28??C (83??F) in the hill regions to more than 40??C (104??F) in the Terai. In winter, average maximum and minimum temperatures in the Terai range from a brisk 7??C (45??F) to a mild 23??C (74??F). The central valleys experience a minimum temperature often falling bellow freezing point and a chilly 12??C (54??F) maximum. Much colder temperatures prevail at higher elevations. The Kathmandu Valley, at an altitude of 1,310m (4,297ft), has a mild climate, ranging from 19-27??C (67-81??F) in summer, and 2-20??C (36-68??F) in winter.

Economy - overview:

Economic growth was expected to ease slightly to 2.5% in 2007, due to the decline in farm output because of poor rain and political unrest. Meanwhile, inflation dropped to 5.6% in 2007, from 7.9% the year before. Official unemployment figures sit at nearly 40%.

Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries. Although little of the land can be cultivated, an estimated 90% of the working population finds employment in agriculture and forestry. Foodstuffs and live animals provide about 30% of Nepal's export earnings. The manufacturing sector is very small and concentrated in light industries.

The country has a considerable hydroelectric potential, but the sector is relatively underdeveloped. There is some mining. Tourism declined with the political turmoil, but has begun to recover.

Nepal relies on substantial amounts of foreign aid, and runs a large external debt. Agreements have been signed with several other governments, including China (PR). Nepal is a member of the Asian Development Bank and the Colombo Plan.

Economy:

Economic growth was expected to ease slightly to 2.5% in 2007, due to the decline in farm output because of poor rain and political unrest. Meanwhile, inflation dropped to 5.6% in 2007, from 7.9% the year before. Official unemployment figures sit at nearly 40%.

Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries. Although little of the land can be cultivated, an estimated 90% of the working population finds employment in agriculture and forestry. Foodstuffs and live animals provide about 30% of Nepal's export earnings. The manufacturing sector is very small and concentrated in light industries.

The country has a considerable hydroelectric potential, but the sector is relatively underdeveloped. There is some mining. Tourism declined with the political turmoil, but has begun to recover.

Nepal relies on substantial amounts of foreign aid, and runs a large external debt. Agreements have been signed with several other governments, including China (PR). Nepal is a member of the Asian Development Bank and the Colombo Plan.
 

 

Industries:

tourism, carpet, textile; small rice, jute, sugar, and oilseed mills; cigarette; cement and brick production

 

Exports:
Clothing, carpet, leather, jute goods and hydroelectric power.

Main trade partners: India, USA, China, United Arab Emirates and Germany.

Imports:
Gold, machinery and equipment, petroleum products and fertiliser.

Exchange rates:
Nepalese Rupee (NPR; symbol Rs) = 100 paisa. Notes are in denominations of Rs1,000, 500, 100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1. Coins are in denominations of 50, 25 and 10 paisa.
http://www.worldtravelguide.net/country/186/money/Indian-Subcontinent/Nepal.html


GDP :
US$6.9 billion (2006).
 

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  Copyright By :  Kish Trade Promotion Center  2002