Persian  | KFZO |  About us  |   Contact Us

                                Kish Trade Promotion Center 

 Home  |   Global Net    Iran Business |    Free Trade Zones  |  Exhibition  |  Trade Opportunities  

Kish Overview

Tourist Information

Shopping Centers

Kish Industry

 Investment in Kish

Training

 Persian  English / German / French / Spanish

 

 

 

Country name:

Ireland

 

Capital:

Dublin. Population: 1.2 million (2006).

 

Location:

Western Europe, occupying five-sixths of the island of Ireland in the North Atlantic Ocean, west of Great Britain

 

Area:

70,182 sq km (27,097 sq miles).
 

Population:

4.5 million (2009)

 

Description:

The Republic of Ireland lies in the north Atlantic Ocean and is separated from Britain by the Irish Sea to the east. The northeastern part of the island (Northern Ireland) is part of the United Kingdom. The country has a central plain surrounded by a rim of mountains and hills offering some of the most varied and unspoilt scenery in Europe – quiet sandy beaches, semi-tropical bays warmed by the Gulf Stream, and rugged cliffs make up the 5,600km (3,500 miles) of coastline.

language:

Although Irish (Gaelic) is the official language, spoken as a first language by about 55,000 people (mostly in the west), English is the language of the overwhelming majority of the population. Official documents are printed in both languages
 


Climate:
The temperate climate is due to mild southwesterly winds and the Gulf Stream. Summers are warm, while temperatures during winter are much cooler. Spring and autumn are very mild. Rain falls all year.

 

 

Map of Ireland

 

Economy - overview:

Ireland's recent economic history is characterised by what is now the cliché of the ‘Celtic Tiger'. Along with Portugal as one of the clear winners of a vigorous EU membership, Ireland transformed from one of the more struggling developed countries - largely because of large scale migration - in Europe to one of the most successful and wealthy, wiping out the brain drain it suffered. In 2005, Economist rated it as having the best quality of life. Like much of western Europe, the knowledge industry is becoming much more important, as is tourism. However, agriculture remains a diminishing, but key sector; beef and dairy dominate the sector, with runners up potatoes, barley and wheat. After a long growth spurt, this economic boom came to a halt in 2008 with the start of the global economic downturn, suffering greatly - the property bubble was particularly inflated here. The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) stated in a report published in April 2008 that Ireland's economy will contract by around 14 per cent by 2010, not recovering until 2011.

Economy:

Ireland's recent economic history is characterised by what is now the cliché of the ‘Celtic Tiger'. Along with Portugal as one of the clear winners of a vigorous EU membership, Ireland transformed from one of the more struggling developed countries - largely because of large scale migration - in Europe to one of the most successful and wealthy, wiping out the brain drain it suffered. In 2005, Economist rated it as having the best quality of life. Like much of western Europe, the knowledge industry is becoming much more important, as is tourism. However, agriculture remains a diminishing, but key sector; beef and dairy dominate the sector, with runners up potatoes, barley and wheat. After a long growth spurt, this economic boom came to a halt in 2008 with the start of the global economic downturn, suffering greatly - the property bubble was particularly inflated here. The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) stated in a report published in April 2008 that Ireland's economy will contract by around 14 per cent by 2010, not recovering until 2011.

 

Industries:

food products, brewing, textiles, clothing; chemicals, pharmaceuticals, machinery, transportation equipment, glass and crystal; software

 

Exports:

Machinery and equipment, computers, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and animals. • Main trade partners: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and The Netherlands.

Imports:

Data processing equipment, transport equipment, grains, textile yarns, and chemicals.

Exchange rates:

Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 cents. http://www.worldtravelguide.net/country/126/money/Europe/Ireland.html

Daily Exchange Rates

GDP :

US$180.7 billion (2006).

 

 

Useful links:

 

  Copyright By :  Kish Trade Promotion Center  2002