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Map of Finland

 

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Weather
 

Travel
    Statistics

 

Country name:

conventional long form: Republic of Finland
conventional short form: Finland
local long form: Suomen Tasavalta
local short form: Suomi

 

Description:

The history and politics of Finland has been shaped by its location, wedged between Sweden to the west, Norway to the north and Russia to the east. The national character of the Finns has been further coloured by the water-logged landscape - the country is hemmed in by the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland and 10% of its landmass lies underwater. Finland has more islands than any other country on earth - 30,000 off the Finnish coast and a further 98,000 islands in its 188,000 inland lakes - and the Saimaa Lake system in the southeast of the country is the largest inland water system in Europe.
By European standards, Finland is very sparsely populated. Around 69% of the country is covered by the pine forests that define the northern coniferous zone. In the south and southwest, the forest is mainly pine, fir and birch; in Lapland, in the far north, scattered dwarf birch forests give way to Arctic tundra. Most of the national forests are managed for timber, which is used for the manufacture of furniture, paper and fibreboards and for domestic heating and warming Finland's 1.6 million saunas. Finland's forests are said to be the most sustainably managed in Europe. Only 8% of the land is used for agriculture - more than 50% of Finns work in manufacturing or the service sector.

 

Capital:

Helsinki. Population: 561,000 (census 2005).

 

Location:

Northern Europe, bordering the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Bothnia, and Gulf of Finland, between Sweden and Russia

 

Area:

338,144 sq km (130,558 sq miles).
 

 

Population:

5.3 million (2009 estimate).
 

 

Languages:

There are two official languages: Finnish, mother tongue for 91.6% of the population, and Swedish, first language of 5.5% of the population
 

 

Climate:
Finland has a reputation as a land of ice and snow, but summers are warm and sunny, with daytime temperatures reaching 25-30ēC (77-86˚F), and even spring and autumn can be surprisingly mild
 

 

Economy - overview:
The Finnish economy was sluggish in the 1990s but buoyant in the early years of the new millennium. As a result, the nation has a budget surplus and low levels of debt, placing Finland in a much better position to weather the global economic downturn than the debt-laden economies of Western Europe.
The Finnish economy has traditionally been driven by the export of timber and paper and heavy manufacturing, but the rise of the Nokia mobile phone company has made Finland a leading light in the world of telecommunication - which along with optics account for some 30% of Finnish exports. Nevertheless, experts are predicting that growth in the Finnish economy will slow to 2.3% in 2009 as a result of the global financial crisis. Finland's GNP per capita is around €34,000, which puts it on a par with the most successful Western European economies.
Although only 8% of land is used for agriculture, Finland is virtually self-sufficient in basic foodstuffs such as grain, dairy products and root crops. However, industry is heavily dependent on imported components. Finland has exploited its geographical position to develop strong trading links to Scandinavia, Western Europe and Russia. The national airline, Finnair has massively expanded its network, particularly in Asia, dramatically increasing the number of tourists visiting Finland en route to other countries.

Unemployment continues to be a problem in rural areas - the overall rate stands at around 7%, but this is inflated by the statistics from Lapland, where unemployment regularly exceeds 11%. In southern Finland, the rate is just 4.7%. Although the economy has been liberalised, the traditional network of social welfare services remains strong - helped by a low rate of population growth - and Finland ranks consistently highly on standard-of-living indices.

Economy:

The Finnish economy was sluggish in the 1990s but buoyant in the early years of the new millennium. As a result, the nation has a budget surplus and low levels of debt, placing Finland in a much better position to weather the global economic downturn than the debt-laden economies of Western Europe.
The Finnish economy has traditionally been driven by the export of timber and paper and heavy manufacturing, but the rise of the Nokia mobile phone company has made Finland a leading light in the world of telecommunication - which along with optics account for some 30% of Finnish exports. Nevertheless, experts are predicting that growth in the Finnish economy will slow to 2.3% in 2009 as a result of the global financial crisis. Finland's GNP per capita is around €34,000, which puts it on a par with the most successful Western European economies.
Although only 8% of land is used for agriculture, Finland is virtually self-sufficient in basic foodstuffs such as grain, dairy products and root crops. However, industry is heavily dependent on imported components. Finland has exploited its geographical position to develop strong trading links to Scandinavia, Western Europe and Russia. The national airline, Finnair has massively expanded its network, particularly in Asia, dramatically increasing the number of tourists visiting Finland en route to other countries.

Unemployment continues to be a problem in rural areas - the overall rate stands at around 7%, but this is inflated by the statistics from Lapland, where unemployment regularly exceeds 11%. In southern Finland, the rate is just 4.7%. Although the economy has been liberalised, the traditional network of social welfare services remains strong - helped by a low rate of population growth - and Finland ranks consistently highly on standard-of-living indices.
 

 

Industries:

metal products, electronics, shipbuilding, pulp and paper, copper refining, foodstuffs, chemicals, textiles, clothing

 

Exports:

Machinery and equipment, chemicals, metals, timber, paper and pulp.

Imports:

Food, petroleum and petroleum products, chemicals, transport equipment, iron and steel.

• Main trade partners: EU (mainly Germany, Sweden and UK), Russian Federation and USA.

Exchange rates:

Euro (EUR; symbol €) = 100 cents. Notes are in denominations of €500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10 and 5. Coins are in denominations of €2 and 1, and 50, 20, 10 and 5 cents. Note that 1 and 2 cent coins, while valid in other eurozone countries, are not used in Finland.
http://www.worldtravelguide.net/country/90/money/Europe/Finland.html

GDP :

US$281.2 billion (2008).
 

Exchange rates:

 

Useful links:

 

  • Ministries & Organization

>>Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Helsinki

>>Government of Finland

>>President of the Republic of Finland

>>Parliament of Finland

>> Prime Minister's Office
>> Ministry for Foreign Affairs
>> Ministry of Justice
>> Ministry of the Interior
>> Ministry of Defense
>> Ministry of Finance
>> Ministry of Education
> >Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry
>> Ministry of Transport and Communications
>> Ministry of Trade and Industry
>> Ministry of Social Affairs and Health
>> Ministry of Labour
>> Ministry of the Environment

 

 

 

 

 

  Copyright By :  Kish Trade Promotion Center  2002